Passover Me Most High Yahuah

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Passover, what does it all really mean anyway? 

Passover, also known as Pesach (H6453) in Hebrew, is a day that we should celebrate as part of the 7 Feast Days of Yahuah.  It all started with Moses and Pharaoh in Egypt.  I’ll quickly paraphrase the story – see Exodus Chapters 3-12 for full story: Yahuah sent Moses to Pharaoh requesting that he let his people (Yashra’al) go.  Pharaoh refused and Yah sent plagues upon Egypt.  One of the plagues was that the first born child will die in all of Egypt.  Yashra’al would only be saved if they put lamb’s blood above their door, on the posts. Once that is done, Yahuah will pass over their house and the plagues will not come upon them.  We are to observe that event as a Festival unto Yahuah throughout our generations. It is an everlasting law (Exodus 12:14)! It is a symbol of redemption from bondage in Egypt.  It is also a symbol of redemption from bondage to sin.  Mashiach/Messiah Yahusha became our Passover Lamb (Leviticus 17:11 ‘For the life of the flesh is in the blood, and I have given it to you upon the altar to make atonement for your lives, for it is the blood that makes atonement for the life.’ )  When we stand at the Judgment seat of Yah, it is the blood covering us that would allow Him to see us because our righteousness is as filthy rags (Isaiah 64:6).  We need Yahusha’s blood for atonement.  If we try to get to Yahuah through another way, it is theft and robbery in the site of Yahuah (John 10:1-2).

When is Passover?

Passover is the 14th day of the first month (Abib) of the year (Leviticus 23:15).  Passover usually falls in the Gregorian month of April.

Who cannot observe Passover?

Any male who is not circumcised of the flesh cannot partake in the Passover (Exodus 12:48).

Yahuah gives a second date to partake in the Passover for those who were unclean or away (Numbers 9:6-13).

So, what are we to do for Passover? 

We are to eat lamb (Exodus 12:3-6).

Passover must be taken with unleavened bread (Deuteronomy 16:1-4) – Passover and Unleavened Bread go hand in hand.

We are to eat bitter herbs (Exodus 12:8). My family usually partake of horseradish.

Scripture gives an example of Yahusha washing feet but it is not a command in Turah (just something awesome to do to show servitude in my opinion) (John 13:1-17)

Is Passover and Easter the same?

Absolutely NOT! In the KJV, you see the word Easter once (Acts 12:4).  When you look at it in the Hebrew or the Strong’s Concordance, it is still the Hebrew word Pesach, which is Passover.  You have to question why the KJV would add the word Easter when all the other words say the correct meaning of Passover. Easter is only found in English translations. Greeks used the term pascha (G3957) which is also the word for Passover. The answer is for deception purposes only.

Easter is a pagan celebration of Ishtar, also known as the Queen of Heaven and Ashtoreth.  She was the fertility goddess.  That’s why you see Easter eggs and bunnies which symbolize sex and children.  Christians observe Easter as the celebration of the resurrection of the Messiah, but there is no record of the disciples observing His resurrection, nor is it a command to do so.  It is a command to keep the Passover, but many people pass over that commandment to observe a pagan day not found in scripture.

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Do you carry DNA of former lovers in your body?

What do you guys think of this article? Very interesting! This is why a lot of women act like men in relationships! Not good!

Posted in pregnancypsychologysciencesex by jenapincott on January 28, 2011

This bit of science arcanum is especially cringe-worthy.

Many years ago, scientists first discovered that a large minority of women have Y-chromosome gene sequences in their blood. At first glance, this seems strange. Men are born with Y-chromosomes but most women are not. The male cells in these women must’ve come from somewhere else.

But where?

The most obvious source is a fetus. Nearly every woman who has ever been pregnant or had a baby has cells from her fetus circulating in her bloodstream. These cells filter through the placenta and reside in the mother’s bloodstream and/or organs — including her heart and brain — for the rest of her life. This condition is called microchimerism, named after the Greek chimera, a creature composed of the parts of multiple animals. Pregnancy-related microchimerism explains why women with sons would have Y-chromosome sequences in their blood.

This is fascinating enough. But how do you explain why women without sons also have male cells circulating in their bloodstream?

This was the subject of a study by immunologists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center. They took blood samples from 120 women without sons and found that 21 percent of them had male DNA. Women were then categorized into four groups according to pregnancy history: women with daughters only, spontaneous abortions, induced abortions, and no children/no abortions.

While the number of women bearing male DNA was highest in the groups that had abortions (nearly 80 percent), women who had only girls or no babies (20 percent) also had male cells in their blood. For no apparent reason.

There are other reasons why women in the fourth group carried male cells: inherited in the womb from a male twin that passed, from a miscarriage they did not know about, from their mother via an older brother…

Or through sexual intercourse.

There remains a possibility, however remote, that cells from a lover may pass be transmitted during sex. Those cells may hang out forever in the recipient’s body, taking residence in any organ. These cells are the imprint of lovers past, a trace of living history.

Might a woman’s bodily fluids enter a cut in a man’s genitals as well? Could men carry around the genes of women they’ve slept with?

The imagination is stirred. What are those foreign cells doing in hearts and minds? Are they wreaking havoc in our heads? Do the cells of former lovers clash? In a science fiction scenario a person could even take a drop of her own blood, isolate a cell from her former boyfriend, and clone him. Then do with him what she will.

The upshot of this research? It’s yet another reason to use a condom.

– See more at: http://jenapincott.com/do-you-carry-the-dna-of-your-former-lovers/#sthash.EyS002gY.dpuf